Skip to content

What Is It

What Is It?

Mediator is a behavioral design pattern that lets you reduce chaotic dependencies between objects. The pattern restricts direct communications between the objects and forces them to collaborate only via a mediator object.

Shiny Mediator is a mediator pattern implementation, but for apps. Apps have pages with lifecycles that don’t necessarily participate in the standard dependency injection lifecycle. .NET MAUI generally tends to favor the Messenger pattern. We hate this pattern for many reasons which we won’t get into. That being said, we do offer a messenger subscription in our Mediator for where interfaces and dependency injection can’t reach.

This project is heavily inspired by MediatR with some lesser features that we feel were aimed more at server scenarios, while also adding some features we feel benefit apps

Features

  • A Mediator for your .NET Apps (MAUI & Blazor are the main targets for us)
  • Request/Response “Command” Handling
  • Event Publication
  • Request & event middleware with some great “out of the box” scenarios for your app
  • Think of “weak” message subscriptions without the fuss or mess to cleanup
  • Our MAUI & Blazor integrations allow your viewmodels or pages to implement an IEventHandler interface(s) without them having to participate in the dependency injection provider
  • We still have a “messagingcenter” type subscribe off IMediator for cases where you can’t have your current type implement an interface
  • Instead of Assembly Scanning, we have source generators to automatically wireup the necessary registrations for you! (WIP)
  • Lightweight, No external dependencies, tiny bit of reflection
  • Help remove service overrun and reduce your constructor fat
  • Easy to Unit Test

Works With

  • .NET MAUI - all platforms
  • MVVM Frameworks like Prism, ReactiveUI, & .NET MAUI Shell
  • Blazor - Work In Progress
  • Any other .NET platform - but you’ll have to come up with your own “event collector” for the out-of-state stuff

What Does It Solve

Problem #1 - Service & Reference Hell

Does this look familiar to you?

public class MyViewModel(
IConnectivity conn,
IDataService data,
IAuthService auth,
IDialogsService dialogs,
ILogger<MyViewModel> logger
) {
// ...
try {
if (conn.IsConnected)
{
var myData = await data.GetDataRequest();
}
else {
dialogs.Show("No Connection");
// cache?
}
}
catch (Exception ex) {
dialogs.Show(ex.Message);
logger.LogError(ex);
}
}

With a bit of our middleware and some events, you can get here:

public class MyViewModel(IMediator mediator) : IEventHandler<ConnectivityChangedEvent>, IEventHandler<AuthChangedEvent> {
// ...
var myData = await mediator.Request(new GetDataRequest());
// logging, exception handling, offline caching can all be bundle into one nice clean call without the need for coupling
}

Problem #2 - Messages EVERYWHERE (+ Leaks)

Do you use the MessagingCenter in Xamarin.Forms? It’s a great tool, but it can lead to some memory leaks if you’re not careful. It also doesn’t have a pipeline, so any errors in any of the responders will crash the entire chain. It doesn’t have a request/response style setup (not that it was meant for it), but this means you still require other services.

public class MyViewModel
{
public MyViewModel()
{
MessagingCenter.Subscribe<SomeEvent1>(this, @event => {
// do something
});
MessagingCenter.Subscribe<SomeEvent2>(this, @event => {
// do something
});
MessagingCenter.Send(new SomeEvent1());
MessagingCenter.Send(new SomeEvent2());
// and don't forget to unsubscribe
MessagingCenter.Unsubscribe<SomeEvent1>(this);
MessagingCenter.Unsubscribe<SomeEvent2>(this);
}
}

Let’s take a look at our mediator in action for this scenarios

public class MyViewModel : IEventHandler<SomeEvent1>, IEventHandler<SomeEvent2>
{
public MyViewModel(IMediator mediator)
{
// no need to unsubscribe
mediator.Publish(new SomeEvent1());
mediator.Publish(new SomeEvent2());
}
}

Problem #3 - Strongly Typed Navigation with Strongly Typed Arguments

Our amazing friends over in Prism offer the “best in class” MVVM framework. We’ll them upsell you beyond that, but one of their amazing features is ‘Modules’. Modules help break up your navigation registration, services, etc.

What they don’t solve is providing a strongly typed nature for this stuff (not their job though). We think we can help addon to their beautiful solution.

A normal call to a navigation service might look like this:

_navigationService.NavigateAsync("MyPage", new NavigationParameters { { "MyArg", "MyValue" } });

This is great. It works, but I don’t know the type OR argument requirements of “MyPage” without going to look it up. In a small project with a small dev team, this is fine. In a large project with a large dev team, this can be difficult.

Through our Shiny.Framework library we offer a GlobalNavigationService that can be used to navigate to any page in your app from anywhere, however, for the nature of this example, we’ll pass our navigation service FROM our viewmodel through the mediator request to ensure proper scope.

public record MyPageNavigatonRequest(INavigationService navigator, string MyArg) : IRequest;
public class MyPageNavigationHandler : IRequestHandler<MyPageNavigatonRequest>
{
public async Task Handle(MyPageNavigatonRequest request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
await request.navigator.NavigateAsync("MyPage", new NavigationParameters { { "MyArg", request.MyArg } });
}
}

Now, in your viewmodel, you can do this:

public class MyViewModel
{
public MyViewModel(IMediator mediator)
{
mediator.Request(new MyPageNavigatonRequest(_navigationService, "MyValue"));
}
}

Strongly typed. No page required page knowledge from the module upfront. The other dev team of the module can define HOW things work.